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City of Belvue

Belvue KS Regular Council Meeting

April 12th, 2021

 

Attendance: Mayor James Horak, Council Members Kevin Fifer, Jenice Howard, Eric Linnebur, John Zapp, City Superintendent Brad Caudill, and City Clerks Denise Howard and Joe Peterson were present.

 The Meeting was called to order at 7:02 pm.

 The City Superintendent Brad Caudill asked when the City Park should be opened, the answer to which was “immediately.” He reported on the non-functioning water heater. A short discussion of water heaters ensued, after which Eric Linnebur made a motion to buy a tankless water heater, the price of which was not to exceed $500. John Zapp seconded, the motion passed unanimously.

 Brad was asked to check into getting netting for the backstop at the Park to keep loose baseballs from getting out into surrounding yards.

 Brad reported that the burn pile was getting too big for the skid steer to pile up, James said he would bring a telehandler down to take care of it.

 The broken table at the Boat Ramp was discussed, the general consensus was to leave it as was, unless there was a danger to the users, in which case it should be removed.

 Brad was asked to begin organizing the City Shop, so that it could be used.

 In recognition that City Superintendent Brad was putting in extra hours over his original salary on road, sewer, park, and shop duties, the Council voted to pay him for 76 hr of work, the total of which was not to exceed $1900. Jenice Howard made the motion to pay Brad, John Zapp seconded, and it passed unanimously.

 The City Clerk reported on the online storage situation and the seeming impossibility of continuing without a credit or debit card on file. Discussion ensued, with some Council members suggesting looking into the possibility of obtaining a card just for this, and others wishing to know what surrounding cities did.

 The Wamego Telecom call assistant was discussed, with questions from last meeting being answered. The Council came to the conclusion that it would be better to obtain an emergency cell phone, and change our message on the answering machine to include the number. The Clerk was asked to look into getting a cell phone through WTC.

 The Clerk showed a City map of roads that need chip & seal, and was asked to contact Mid American for a quote, and the County to see who they had for their chip & seal needs this year.

 The water tower report was discussed, and Maguire Iron’s offer of a free inspection was accepted, the idea being to compare their report with Suez. This will give the City two reports to better understand the situation, and obtain two bids for upkeep.

The utility policy was touched on, the Clerk offered to review various policies with an eye to drafting a policy for the Council to review.

 The insurance situation was updated, and the effective date of supplementary pay for the Mayor was clarified.

 The Clerk was asked to notify Pugh & Pugh that their help was no longer needed on clarifying the City election laws.

 The Minutes from the March 8th Regular Meeting and the March 15th Special Meeting were read, and accepted with slight amendments.

 Kevin Fifer asked the City for a letter approving a garage he wished to rebuild on County land. The County wanted to make sure the City was fine with it, as it fronts the City limits. The Clerk was asked to draft a letter for the County, expressing the City’s approval for the work.

 At 9:52 pm, Jenice Howard made the motion to adjourn the meeting, Kevin Fifer seconded, and the vote passed with all present in favor, John Zapp abstained from the vote.

 Respectfully submitted,

 Joe Peterson

City Clerk, Belvue KS

 

   

City of Belvue

City of Belvue KS Special Council Meeting

March 15, 2021

Attendance: City Council Members present: Mayor James Horak, Kevin Fifer, Eric Linnebur, Matt Barr, John Zapp, and Jenice Howard.

City Superintendent: Brad Caudill

City Clerks: Denise Howard and Joe Peterson

Meeting called to order at 7:00pm.

The Council discussed changes to the current City insurance policy and whether or not to add an Employee Dishonesty Policy to it. After discussion, it was agreed to raise the deductible of the current insurance from $500 to $2500 for a savings of $780 per year; to leave the Errors and Omissions coverage at $500,000, which is the maximum penalty allowed under Kansas law at this time; not to obtain the Employment Practices Liability at this time, as City employees have no contracts with the City; to leave the coverage for replacement of the Fire Bam in case of accident at $409,000 for this year; to increase coverage on the contents of the Fire Bam from $5,000 to $10,000 for $20 per year; and to obtain an Employee Dishonesty Policy for $ 338 per year to cover 9 members. Jenice Howard made the motion to accept the above mentioned terms, Eric Linnebur seconded the motion. Motion passed unanimously.

Much discussion centered around the streets, both as to the funds available in the budget and as to which streets ought to be chip and sealed this year. The Council agreed that the best way to achieve this is to obtain street by street quotes, then decide how far the funds will cover and what streets have priority this year.

City Clerk Joe Peterson then spoke about acquiring an automated phone system with the ability to transfer the call to another phone in case of emergency. WTC offers such a service for $20 per year. The Council had many questions, and asked him to find out more and report at the next meeting.

The Council authorized the City Clerk to obtain a new computer, monitor, and scanner, together with the necessary accessories from St Marys Computers and Printing, the purchase not to exceed $1200. Kevin Fifer made the motion, John Zapp seconded, and it passed unanimously.

There was a brief presentation of the Clerk’s meeting with Scott Harmon, head of the IT department at Onyx, as to the ease and technical knowledge required to back up paper documents with electronic files. The result of the meeting was a definite recommendation to use the cloud as backup, as the City has neither the resources nor know how to set up multiple backups. Dropbox and Box were the two companies mentioned. Kevin Fifer made the motion to obtain a Dropbox account for the City for $205 per year for 3TB of storage. Jenice Howard seconded, and it passed unanimously.

There was brief discussion on the outstanding debts on several water accounts. The Clerk was asked to draft letters to some of them, encouraging them to pay their bills. Others had demonstrated sufficient willingness to pay, and will be left alone at this time. The Council will review the St Marys Utilities Policy, with the prospect of adapting it to fit our current situation in Belvue.

At 8:57, Kevin Fifer made the motion to adjourn the meeting. Eric Linnebur seconded, and the motion passed unanimously.

Respectfully submitted,

Joe Peterson

City Clerk, City of Belvue

  

 

 

 

 

City of Belvue

Consumer Confidence Report – 2021

Covering Calendar Year – 2020

 

This brochure is a snapshot of the quality of the water that we provided last year. Included are the details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state standards. We are committed to providing you with information because informed customers are our best allies. If you would like to observe the decision-making process that affect drinking water quality, please call Norman Stutzman at 785-456-1597.

Our drinking water is supplied from another water system through a Consecutive Connection (CC).Your water comes from :

 

Buyer Name

Seller Name

City of Belvue

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

 

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as those with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) included rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in sources water before we treat it include:

Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, livestock operations and wildlife.

Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming.

Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as storm water run-off, agriculture, and residential users.

Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or the result of mining activity.

Organic contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and also come from gas stations, urban storm water run-off, and septic systems.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulation which limits the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. We treat our water according to EPA’s regulations. Food and Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health.

Our water system is required to test a minimum of 2 samples per month in accordance with the Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. Coliform bacteria are usually harmless, but their presence in water can be an indication of disease-causing bacteria. When coliform bacteria are found, special follow-up tests are done to determine if harmful bacteria are present in the water supply. If this limit is exceeded, the water supplier must notify the public.

Water Quality Data

The following tables list all of the drinking water contaminants which were detected during the 2020 calendar year. The presence of these contaminants does not necessarily indicate the water poses a health risk. Unless noted, the data presented in this table is from the testing done January 1- December 31, 2020. The state requires us to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year to year. Some of the data, though representative of the water quality, is more than one year old. The bottom line is that the water that is provided to you is safe.

 

Terms & Abbreviations

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL): recommended level for a contaminant that is not regulated and has no MCL.

Action Level (AL): the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements.

Treatment Technique (TT): a required process intended to reduce levels of a contaminant in drinking water.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): the highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Non-Detects (ND): lab analysis indicates that the contaminant is not present.

Parts per Million (ppm) or milligrams per liter (mg/l)

Parts per Billion (ppb) or micrograms per liter (µg/l)

Picocuries per Liter (pCi/L): a measure of the radioactivity in water.

Millirems per Year (mrem/yr): measure of radiation absorbed by the body.

Monitoring Period Average (MPA): An average of sample results obtained during a defined time frame, common examples of monitoring periods are monthly, quarterly and yearly.

Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU): a measure of the clarity of water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person. Turbidity is not regulated for groundwater systems.

Running Annual Average (RAA): an average of sample results obtained over the most current 12 months and used to determine compliance with MCLs.

Locational Running Annual Average (LRAA): Average of sample analytical results for samples taken at a particular monitoring location during the previous four calendar quarters.

 

Testing Results for: City of Belvue

 

Disinfection Byproducts

Monitoring Period

Highest RAA

Range

(low/high)

Unit

MCL

MCLG

Typical Source

TOTAL HALOACETIC ACIDS (HAA5)

2019

2

2.3

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

TOTAL TRIHALOMETHANES (TTHMs)

2019

5

5.3

ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water chlorination

 

Lead and Copper

Monitoring Period

90th Percentile

Range

(low/high)

Unit

AL

Sites Over AL

Typical Source

COPPER, FREE

2018 - 2020

0.0625

0.0083 - 0.067

ppm

1.3

0

Corrosion of household plumbing

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Your water system is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

Chlorine/Chloramines

Maximum Disinfection Level

MPA

MPA Units

RAA

RAA Units

 

 

 

 

 

10/01/2020 - 10/31/2020

1.3

MG/L

0.9

MG/L

 

During the 2020 calendar year, we had no violation(s) of drinking water regulations.

There are no additional required health effects notices.

There are no additional required health effects violation notices.


Some or all of our drinking water is supplied from another water system. The table below lists all of the drinking water contaminants, which were detected during the 2020 calendar year from the water systems that we purchase drinking water from.

 

Regulated Contaminants

Collection Date

Water System

Highest Value

Range

(low/high)

Unit

MCL

MCLG

Typical Source

BARIUM

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

0.19

0.19

ppm

2

2

Discharge from metal refineries

CHROMIUM

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

2.9

2.9

ppb

100

100

Discharge from steel and pulp mills

FLUORIDE

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

0.21

0.21

ppm

4

4

Natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth.

NITRATE

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

1.3

1.3

ppm

10

10

Runoff from fertilizer use

SELENIUM

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

3.5

3.5

ppb

50

50

Erosion of natural deposits

 

Secondary Contaminants

Collection Date

Water System

Highest Value

Range

(low/high)

Unit

SMCL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALKALINITY, TOTAL

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

410

410

MG/L

300

CALCIUM

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

120

120

MG/L

200

CHLORIDE

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

8.6

8.6

MG/L

250

CONDUCTIVITY @ 25 C UMHOS/CM

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

800

800

UMHO/CM

1500

CORROSIVITY

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

0.31

0.31

LANG

0

HARDNESS, TOTAL (AS CACO3)

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

410

410

MG/L

400

IRON

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

0.29

0.29

MG/L

0.3

MAGNESIUM

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

28

28

MG/L

150

MANGANESE

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

0.029

0.029

MG/L

0.05

NICKEL

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

0.001

0.001

MG/L

0.1

PH

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

7.2

7.2

PH

8.5

PHOSPHORUS, TOTAL

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

0.13

0.13

MG/L

5

POTASSIUM

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

1.7

1.7

MG/L

100

SILICA

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

20

20

MG/L

50

SODIUM

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

21

21

MG/L

100

SULFATE

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

48

48

MG/L

250

TDS

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

500

500

MG/L

500

ZINC

1/6/2020

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

0.023

0.023

MG/L

5



Please Note: Because of sampling schedules, results may be older than 1 year.

During the 2020 calendar year, the water systems that we purchase water from had the below noted violation(s) of drinking water regulations.

Water System

Type

Category

Analyte

Compliance Period

Pottawatomie County RWD 4

MONITORING, ROUTINE (DBP), MAJOR

MON

CDS_DBP_TOTALS

01/01/2020 - 12/31/2020